Australian Outback Vacations In Nullarbor

If you want to experience the ultimate in road trips, look no further than the Nullarbor Plain. Nullarbor is derived from two Latin words meaning "no trees" and this is a very accurate description of the area. Although arid and barren, there is not only incredible beauty in this land, but also lots to see. Covering 77,000 square miles, Nullabor is one of the largest semi arid Karst deserts in the world. The gateway to the desert is the Nullarbor Roadhouse, a motel and service station located next to the historic Nullarbor Homestead. North of here are the Murrawijinie Caves which can be toured with National Parks officers. The desert is home to a large network of caves which are dramatically cut into the rocks, and are often multiple kilometers wide.

East of the roadhouse is the Head of Bight, a popular whale watching spot. Here southern right whales can be viewed from May to the end of October as they congregate in groups of up to one hundred individuals. Boardwalks take visitors to lookouts where they can see the whales and also enjoy the breathtaking view of the cliffs that drop from the Nullabor Plain into the ocean below. Another area that should be a stop on all itineraries is the Nullarbor Bunda Cliffs, a series of lookouts that stretch for over two hundred kilometers.

Along the way, try a stop in Iron Knob, and trace the town's importance in the steel industry at the Mining Museum. More than just a place to stop for services, Nundroo offers excellent fishing, surfing, and local history. If you are interested in Aboriginal culture, stop at the Ceduna Aboriginal Arts and Culture Center, where you'll find authentic art and gifts, and the Language Center that is working to preserve the many varied Aboriginal languages.